Shelley M Park

Shelley M Park, Ph.D.

Dr. Park teaches in the Philosophy and the Humanities & Cultural Studies programs. She is also a faculty affiliate of the Women's and Gender Studies program and the Texts and Technologies program.

Dr. Park is committed to the ongoing project of dismantling white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy. She stands behind the UCF Department of Philosophy's Anti-Racism Statement and recognizes that all the work she does at the University of Central Florida, including the work of anti-racism, takes place on appropriated lands that are the traditional territories of the Miccosukee and Seminoles. 

Dr. Park's research and teaching interests include Feminist Theory, Queer Theory, Postcolonial Theory, Cultural Studies, Motherhood Studies, and Science & Technology Studies with an emphasis on queer and technologically mediated forms of care. Courses she regularly teaches include: Feminist Theory, Theories of Sex & Gender in the Humanities, Race & Technology, and Introduction to Philosophy.

Dr. Park has served as Director of the Women's Studies Program (1997-2000) and Chair of the Department of Philosophy (2000-2003). She has also served on numerous university, college, and department committees, is a certified diversity trainer, queer faculty ally and past President and current council member of the United Faculty of Florida-UCF.  She is past President of the Florida Philosophical Association (2004) , founding co-Editor of the Florida Philosophical Review (2000-2003) and founding associate Editor and current editorial board member of Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture (2015-present). She has also served on the Steering committees, Program Committees, Diversity Committees and Awards Committees of several regional and national professional organizations of which she is a member.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Philosophy from Duke University (1990)
  • M.A. in Philosophy from University of Calgary (1984)
  • B.A. in Philosophy from University of Calgary (1982)

Research Interests

  • Critical kinship studies, with an emphasis on non-normative forms of mothering
  • Precarity and care, especially as these intersect with emerging technologies
  • Queer, feminist, decolonial analyses of contemporary U.S. culture, including institutional cultures
  • Social justice

Recent Research Activities

I am currently working on a monograph on the ethics of care in a technological era.  Related projects include work in progress on the gendering of surveillance technologies, the haunting of social robotics by the colonial past, and the ways in which technologies of care both address and perpetuate precarity. 

Selected Publications

Books

Edited Collections

Articles/Essays

Book Sections/Chapters

Translation

Book Reviews

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • Shelley M. Park, "From Care-o-Bot to HUMANS: (Psycho)analyzing the Uncanny Valley Problem." IaPH: International association of women philosophers (Zoom host: University of Paderborn, Germany) July 2021
  • Shelley M. Park, "Theorizing e-carity: Where care, technology, and precarity meet." Care ethics research consortium (Zoom hosts: University of Ottawa, Carleton University, University of Humanistic Studies, Netherlands) May 2021.
  • Shelley M. Park, “Helicopter Moms: Domesticating our Fear of the Surveillance State,” Florida Philosophical Association, Gainesville, FL, Nov 2019.
  • Shelley M. Park, “Glass Ceilings, Ivory Basements, and Gendered Divisions of Labor in the Academy,” Florida Philosophical Association, Pensacola, FL, November 2018
  • Shelley M. Park, "Technologies of Care, Technologies of Precarity," Care Ethics Research Consortium, Portland, OR, Sept 2018
  • Shelley M. Park, “Re-Thinking the Uncanny Valley from a Feminist, Decolonial Perspective,” Florida Philosophical Association, Ocala, FL, November 2017.  
  • Shelley M. Park, Unsettling Feminist Philosophy: An Encounter with Tracey Moffat's Night Cries, Feminist Ethics and Social Theory conference.  Clearwater, FL, October 2017.
  • Shelley M. Park, Helicopter Moms and Smart Homes: Fears of the (M)other in the Surveillance State. PhiloSOPHIA, Boca Raton, FL. April 2017. 

  • Shelley M. Park, Polyamory is to Polygamy as Queer is to Barbaric? Queer Kinship and Relationship Conference.  Zalesie Mazury, Poland. June 2015.

  • Shelley M. Park, When Feminism and Queerness Collide: The Case of Jian Ghomeshi. Popular Culture Association.  New Orleans, LA.  April 2015.

  • Shelley M. Park, Cyborg Mothering:  The Ethics of Care in a Technological Era. Florida Philosophical Association.  Tampa, FL.  November 2014.

  • Shelley M. Park, The Diversity Problem in Philosophy. Florida Philosophical Association. Deland, FL. November 2013.

  • Shelley M. Park, One and Only One Mother?  Resisting Monomaternalism.  Florida Philosophical Association.  November 2012.

  • Shelley M. Park, Where are All the Cyborg Mothers?  Reflections on the Posthuman Maternal Body.  Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy.  Calgary, AB, October 2012.

  • Shelley M. Park, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: An Exploration of Polymaternal Families.  Society for Women in Philosophy, Eastern Division.  Washington, D.C. December 2011.

  • Monomaternalism and the Politics of Mothering in Adoptive, Queer, and Blended Families. Association for Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.  Illinois.  September 2011.

  • Shelley M. Park, Queer Family Values in Showtime’s The United States of Tara. Popular Culture Association. San Antonio, TX. March 2010. 

  • Shelley M. Park, Queer Family Values in HBO’s Big Love. Popular Culture Association. New Orleans, LA. March 2009.
  • Shelley M. Park, (Inter)Disciplinary Homes, Queer Orientations. Breaking Boundaries, Forging Connections conference.  Halifax, NS.  April 2008.

Invited Lectures/Presentations

  • Panelist, “Queer Kinship and Care,” Revaluing Care in the Global Economy. Duke University.
  • Keynote. “From Helicopter Moms to Smart(er) Homes:  Technological Fantasies of Care and Control,” Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Undergraduate Philosophy Conference.  Edwardsville, Illinois, October 2019
  • Keynote. "When Feminism and Queerness Collide: Reflections on the #metoo Movement," University of Florida Undergraduate Philosophy Conference.  Gainesville, FL, April 2018.
  • Keynote. "Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood," University of South Carolina—Upstate, Bodies of Knowledge Symposium. March 2016.  

  • Lecture. "FLDS Mothers as Subaltern Subjects." University of Calgary, Department of Philosophy 50th Anniversary Lecture Series, Calgary, Alberta. January 2016. 

  • Plenary. "Good” (Queer) Mothers and “Bad” (Queer) Mothers:  Contested Representations of Polygamist Women in Popular Culture.  Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement. Toronto, ON, June 2013.  Also presented to the Cultural Studies Association. Chicago, IL, May 2013.

  • Keynote. "Nomadic Musings." Queer Week.  New College.  Sarasota, FL, 2009.

Miscellaneous Publications

Awards

  • UCF Scroll and Quill Society Inductee, 2019
  • UCF Women Faculty Life@UCF Award nominee for transforming student lives, 2019
  • UCF Research Incentive Award, 2018
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2017
  • UCF Research Sabbatical (competitive), 2017
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2012
  • UCF Research Sabbatical (competitive), 2010
  • UCF Women’s Research Center Award, 2009
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2007

Activities

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
20564 HUM4381 Race and Technology Face to Face (P) Tu,Th 01:30 PM - 02:45 PM Unavailable
 A critical exploration of the role of race as it intersects with gender, sexuality, ability, class and other variables, in the production, consumption, and representation of technology from dating apps to social robotics. We will also explore how technologies produce, reproduce, engender and contest race and racism. Our focus will be on new and emerging technologies as well as their cultural representations.
19417 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Unavailable
This course examines a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.
10805 PHM3123 Feminist Theories Face to Face (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
 This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of recent and contemporary movements for women’s liberation and how both the notion of “women” and the notion of “liberation” have changed in recent decades.  Theoretical perspectives to be examined (some more carefully than others) include:  liberal feminism, radical feminism, care feminism, Marxist feminism, multicultural feminism, postcolonial, decolonial, and decarceral feminisms, post-structuralist feminism, ecofeminism, crip theory, and queer theory.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81226 HUM3326 Theories Sex & Gender in Hum Limited Attendance (RS) Tu 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
Recent and contemporary theories concerning sex and gender and their interplay with popular culture and everyday life. Theories to be examined include: post-structuralist theories of gender, feminist theories of sex and gender, biological theories of nature and nurture, developmental systems theories of sex and sexuality, critical race theories concerning the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality, and phenomenological theories of the lived experiences of sexual and other orientations. 
81176 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available
We will explore concepts and themes related to the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will discuss these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.
81263 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available
We will explore concepts and themes related to the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will discuss these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50408 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) A Available
This course examines a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
20320 HUM4932 Special Topics Web-Based (W) Available
A critical exploration of the role of race as it intersects with gender, sexuality, ability, class and other variables, in the production, consumption, and representation of technology from dating apps to social robotics. We will also explore how technologies produce, reproduce, engender and contest race and racism. Our focus will be on new and emerging technologies as well as their cultural representations.  Questions to be considered include: What roles have people of color and other marginalized groups played in the development of technology? How has technological change engendered racial identities?   What are the continuities and discontinuities between colonial and contemporary technologies of race?  How does technology offer possibilities for new racial identities, representations, and relations?  What are the social implications of technology and how is it understood and deployed in different cultural contexts? 
11228 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available
In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.
11069 PHM3123 Feminist Theories Web-Based (W) Available
This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of recent and contemporary movements for women’s liberation and how both the notion of “women” and the notion of “liberation” has changed in recent decades.  Theoretical perspectives to be examined (some more carefully than others) include:  liberal feminism, radical feminism, care feminism, Marxist feminism, multicultural feminism, postcolonial, decolonial, and decarceral feminisms, post-structuralist feminism, ecofeminism, crip theory, and queer theory.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81800 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

81801 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

93516 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
51074 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web-Based (W) A Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

Updated: Jul 9, 2021