Farrah Cato

Farrah Cato

Research Interests

  • Speculative Fiction
  • Magical Realism
  • Womanist Studies and Intersectional Feminisms
  • Women's Craft Works as Technologies as Resistance
  • Women's Material Culture
  • Critical Making


Awards


  • 2020 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2016 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award
  • 2015 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2012 Online Schools Top 20 Latin & Hispanic Professors in Florida
  • 2010 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2010 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10418 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ Web-Based (W) Unavailable
No Description Available
20512 LIT3368 Magical Realism in Literature Face to Face (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
93364 LIT3381 Women Writers of Color Web-Based (W) Unavailable
This is a post-1865 literary history class. This class is designated as a "diversity" class.

This course will examine theory, poetry, and fiction produced by women writers of color in the Americas. We will investigate how these writers grapple with complex ideas about gender, ethnicity, class, and sexuality while also thinking about how they engage with one another (and us) across time, space, and genre. We will begin by reading the words of writer-theorists like Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, and Gloria Anzaldúa as a way to start understanding key concepts like Womanism and intersectionality. We'll use those theories to examine more closely works from writers like Octavia Butler, Nalo Hopkinson, and NK Jemisin, dabbling in everything from the dystopic to the fantastic and even the hauntingly real.
81675 LIT3933 Literature and Law Web-Based (W) Unavailable
This is a post-1865 literary history class. This class is designated as a "diversity" class.

This section of Literature and Law will examine textual representations of literary (in)justice. We’ll encounter vigilantes, avengers, and other provocative figures who urge us to think critically about how we define justice, put those definitions into practice, and what happens when those definitions are challenged. Through discussions about power, community & the individual, gender, race & ethnicity, religion, the environment, how we use language, and more, we'll consider the larger legal, ethical, and moral implications of the texts. We will wrestle with a host of legal, ethical, and moral conundrums, such as what counts as justice; who determines fair and just punishment for lawbreakers; who determines just compensation for victims; and how and when we determine which laws are worth following and upholding or not.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61252 LIT3381 Women Writers of Color Web-Based (W) A Unavailable
This is a post-1865 literary history class. This class is designated as a "diversity" class.

This course will examine theory, poetry, and fiction produced by women writers of color in the Americas.  We will investigate how these writers grapple with complex ideas about gender, ethnicity, class, and sexuality while also thinking about how they engage with one another (and us) across time, space, and genre.  We will begin by reading the words of writer-theorists like Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, and Gloria Anzaldúa as a way to start understanding key concepts like Womanism and intersectionality.  In six very short weeks, we'll use these theories to examine more closely works from writers like Octavia Butler and Nalo Hopkinson, and we'll dabble in everything from the dystopic to the mythical and the legendary to the quixotic.  
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10428 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ Web-Based (W) Unavailable
LIT 2110.0W61 World Literature 1
Renegades, rebels, rogues, tricksters, and the like will be the focus of this survey of early world literature. We will examine versions of this figure at various times, spaces, and places, from the Greeks to the Mayans to Shakespeare. We will investigate how they work within and against the prevailing ideas of their day, and what their tricks, cons, and/or challenges mean in their varied cultural contexts. Sometimes, our discussion will focus on individual characters, sometimes it may focus on authors, and sometimes the trickster element will be more implicit than explicit. 
19556 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Mixed-Mode/Reduce Seat-Time(M) Tu 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
LIT 3932.0001 Topics in Popular Fic: Literary Retellings
This section of Topics in Popular Fiction is subtitled “Tales from the Other(ed) Side: Literary Re-visions.” We will read contemporary retellings that are based on a variety of texts, including Greek & Roman epics, fairy & folk tales, myths, legends, and more. Not only are these literary retellings of well-known literature, but they are also texts that emphasize the voice of the racialized, gendered, or sexualized “Other.”  It isn’t necessary for you to know all of the “original” texts before you read these retellings (although it may be more enjoyable if you do know them). One of our collective goals this semester will be to explore those “old” texts and to consider how and why these “new” versions might still be important and relevant.  

 

Please note that even though our readings are "popular" and well-known, many of these texts (like much of the source material they are based on) also contain subject matter that may be triggering to some students.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81722 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web-Based (W) Unavailable
AML 3031:

In this course, we will survey American literature from its beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth century.  We will consider the voices of men and women, the enslaved and the free, the colonized and the colonizer.  By reading first-hand accounts, journals, lectures, novels, and poetry, we will: 

  • explore how early Americans viewed and responded to the various events of their day, 
  • consider how these writers try to make sense of their world and their roles within it, 
  • examine how these texts reflect Pratt’s notion of the “contact zone,”  
  • consider how these texts reflect a constantly-evolving definition of what counts as “America” and what it means to be an American,  
  • reflect on the continued relevance (and impact) of these texts today  

No courses found for Summer 2021.

Updated: Feb 2, 2022