Farrah Cato

Farrah Cato

Research Interests

  • Speculative Fiction
  • Magical Realism
  • Womanist Studies and Intersectional Feminisms
  • American Literature
  • Women's Technologies as Resistance
  • Digital Humanities

Awards

  • 2016 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award
  • 2015 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2012 Online Schools Top 20 Latin & Hispanic Professors in Florida
  • 2010 UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award
  • 2010 CAH Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10428 LIT2110 World Literature Ⅰ Web-Based (W) Unavailable
No Description Available
19556 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Face to Face (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81722 AML3031 American Literature Ⅰ Web-Based (W) Unavailable
AML 3031:

In this course, we will survey American literature from its beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth century.  We will consider the voices of men and women, the enslaved and the free, the colonized and the colonizer.  By reading first-hand accounts, journals, lectures, novels, and poetry, we will: 

  • explore how early Americans viewed and responded to the various events of their day, 
  • consider how these writers try to make sense of their world and their roles within it, 
  • examine how these texts reflect Pratt’s notion of the “contact zone,”  
  • consider how these texts reflect a constantly-evolving definition of what counts as “America” and what it means to be an American,  
  • reflect on the continued relevance (and impact) of these texts today  
81463 LIT3932 Topics in Popular Fiction Web-Based (W) Unavailable
LIT 3932:
This online section of Topics in Popular Fiction will focus on Speculative Fiction (fantasy, science fiction, magical realism, and more) written by women authors such as Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Octavia Butler, and N.K. Jemisin.  Writers such as these typically ask “what if?” about various social and political issues, and our primary role this semester will be to consider the larger implications of their questions, typically—though not exclusively—through discussions about power, politics, community & the individual, gender, race & ethnicity, or how we use language.   

No courses found for Summer 2021.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19643 LIT3368 Magical Realism in Literature Video Strmng (V1) COVD DL exmp Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable
This course will examine magical realism in a variety of ways, with particular attention to its cultural, social, and postcolonial contexts. We will read Latin American writers like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isabel Allende, and we will also explore magical realism as a global phenomenon via the works of writers like Salman Rushdie and Naguib Mahfouz. For much of the course, we will grapple with the question of what’s at stake in using the “magical” to confront pressing, “real world” issues. 
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
92219 LIT3381 Women Writers of Color Web-Based (W) Unavailable
No Description Available

No courses found for Summer 2020.

Updated: Jul 12, 2021